Design Expedition

Exploring the world of design, one city at a time.

Our annual Design Expedition (DX) was developed to engage a diverse cross-section of employees in design discussions while immersing ourselves in a broad range of urban environments. While visiting and documenting buildings is a core activity, the primary function of DX is discourse. Discussions are intended to elevate GBBN design rigor and spark investigations that can permeate the firm through research, discovery, and narratives.

DX 2018

Why San Francisco? Staying abreast of the best in digital design and fabrication is part of our ongoing commitment to incorporate these techniques into our work. San Francisco offered several places for us to explore projects from concept to fabrication to installation. Kreysler’s façade at SF MOMA is a perfect example. We were able to visit Kresyler’s fabrication site and then see the finished façade in place at the museum. What we saw, what we did: In addition to Kreysler, we visited Autodesk’s Pier 9 and Gallery and the DeYoung Museum. Firsthand conversations with other designers and fabricators led to one of our major takeaways: It’s not about a project’s size or budget, the gritty work of finding solutions happens at every scale. Evening shuffleboard smackdowns at the Hotel Zetta, trivia at Rosamund Grill and sampling some amazing Korean barbecue rounded out the trip.

DX 2017

Why Los Angeles? Home to over 4 million people, Los Angeles continues to grow and diversify—racially, economically, and architecturally. Our DX 2017 itinerary included iconic buildings types—housing, worship, museum, education, performance—across the city: Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, The Broad, Emerson College LA, The Holocaust Museum, Schindler House, Skid Row Housing, and Disney Hall. What we saw, what we did: Discussions during DX17 focused on creating bold vision and how we can continually work collaboratively to achieve it. Transformative spaces don’t come easily, they come from working to maintain a project vision from concept through constructions documents. In addition to touring amazing spaces, our weeklong stay at downtown L.A.’s Ace Hotel (originally built in 1927 as the home of renegade movie studio United Artists) was chock full of activities on topics like storyboarding, design vision & language, poetic problem solving, and how technology shapes our vocabulary.

Download DX 2017 Book

DX 2016

 

Why Toronto? With a population of 2.8 million people, Toronto is heralded as one of the most multicultural cities in the world. Since the 2000’s, Toronto has experienced a period of architectural revival, with several buildings by world-renowned architects having opened during the late 2000’s. Daniel Libeskind’s Royal Ontario Museum addition, Frank Gehry’s remake of the Art Gallery of Ontario, and Will Alsop’s distinctive Ontario College of Art & Design expansion are among the city’s new showpieces. The historic Distillery District, located on the eastern edge of downtown, has been redeveloped into a pedestrian-oriented arts, culture, and entertainment neighborhood. What we saw, what we did: Our time in Toronto focused on unpacking two themes: Informed Form (design + research) and Reflection v. Reaction (pushing back against the status quo). Our itinerary included Bar Raval, The Donnelly Centre at the University of Toronto, The Queen-Richmond Centre West, Ryerson University Student Learning Centre, the Wave Deck, Branksome Hall Athletics + Wellness Centre, and Bridgepoint Hospital. Activities included sketching, video documenting, role playing, and storyboarding.

Download DX 2016 Book

DX 2015

Why Philadelphia? For our inaugural Design Expedition, we traveled to the city that may be as famous for a sandwich (our favorite: Jim’s Steaks) as it is for being the birthplace of The United States Constitution. What we saw, what we did: Our design itinerary included touring the Wharton Esherick House, Swarthmore College, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, The Barnes Foundation, and the University of Pennsylvania. Small group discussions happened after each tour to reflect on what we saw and learned from each visit. Our travel team participated in group exercises to discuss how we form our project teams and possible advancements to help us do our best work on every project. We used role playing exercises to practice communicating design ideas to various stakeholders like clients, community groups, and consultants. Fittingly enough, our trip to Philadelphia was the beginning of the evolution of our Guiding Principles, which define why we do what we do, how we work, and what it means to us. The takeaway from this work: When are doing our best work, our designs reflect a deep understanding of both the experiential quality of the space and how people use it AND the performance of the built environment and how it is constructed. The Venn Diagram was created to depict this concept and has become a beacon to guide our design teams.